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    Valves aren't just for tires

    It’s a balmy summer evening on the patio or in the garden, or perhaps with friends in the park or on the beach. Perfectly rounded off with a juicy steak or sausage from the barbeque topped with tasty mustard or a tangy sauce. So far, a tempting, mouth-watering idea. And now, just imagine sitting there ravenous and eager with your plate on your lap, trying to get the ketchup out of the glass bottle onto your plate without any mishap. If you’re lucky, nothing will come out of the bottle at all – that’s the lesser of two evils. What usually happens though is that nothing comes at first and then, after some shaking and thumping, half the contents of the bottle suddenly splash onto your plate. Here too, there are two variants: either everything on the plate is covered with ketchup or some other sauce, making the food more or less inedible. Or, what’s even worse, you stain a new blouse or shirt, or thoroughly bespatter your parents-in-law’s tablecloth. In either case, the mess is annoying or even embarrassing. And what am I leading up to?

    Valve closures are the solution for clean, exact dispensing


    But how does this even remotely relate to a manufacturer of closures and other injection-molded packaging components? Perhaps a further example will shed some light on the matter: the fresh breakfast rolls have been buttered and are only waiting for the honey to top them off. The spoon dips into the delectable mass and then transfers it to the roll. However, it can take some time before the last drop of honey has landed where you want it, and meanwhile your arm is getting heavier and heavier. Of course, it is also possible to dip your knife into the honey jar, but crumbs and bits of butter that remain in the honey are not really appetizing. To say nothing of the lack of a precise dosing option. And there is hardly anybody who has not had the experience under the shower of much too much shampoo spilling out of its bottle in a sudden gush. Every one of us has at some time or other gone through these or similar incidents in our daily lives – and has been maddened time and again. And this despite the fact that a means to avoid the above awkward situations has been available for some years, namely valves. There are many examples of their successful use in ketchup, honey and shampoo bottles. Valve closures ensure that nothing escapes from the bottle unless it is supposed to. In addition, they enable an output of the relevant product that is precisely dosed and clean. Just a little pressure on the bottle and the required amount of the product inside is allowed to exit. The slits in the valve closure open due to the resulting overpressure and the mustard lands in a neat portion on the sausage, the honey on the bread roll, and the shampoo in your hand or on your hair – without any mess or excess product. This is because the flow immediately stops once the pressure on the bottle is reduced

    Sustainable and environmentally safe – valve closures made of recyclable materials


    These valve closures are of course not really new, but they are definitely practical. And naturally enough, MENSHEN also have valve closures on offer. It goes without saying that we are not alone on the market with this product. But our valve closure stands out from all others because it is made of thermoplastic elastomer (TPE). This material is soft to the touch and has a major advantage over the silicone used for most other valves in that it is 100% recyclable. At times when sustainability, waste separation and environmental protection are high-priority issues, this is a significant unique feature. Besides that, the valve is already manufactured with slits. This means that the otherwise customary, supplementary production step to cut the slits later is unnecessary, saving time and costs. Thus, the MENSHEN solution offers a lot more extras in addition to the benefits of a valve closure.

     

     

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    About the Author

    Christian Nöh

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